Claire Corlett

Fish Food, Fish Tanks, and More
HUNTING EELS | BONAIRE DIVE TRIP

HUNTING EELS | BONAIRE DIVE TRIP


Eels might look like snakes but they are actually fish. There are over 400 species of eels. During my recent trip to Bonaire, I was fortunate to observe quite active Spotted Moray Eels, Green Moray Eels, and a Sharptail Eel. I was able to capture some of the Eels hunting and capturing their prey. Moray eels are cosmopolitan, found in both tropical and temperate seas, although the largest species richness is at reefs in warm oceans. Very few species occur outside the tropics or subtropics, and the ones that do only extend marginally beyond these regions. They live at depths to several hundred metres, where they spend most of their time concealed inside crevices and alcoves. The Sharptail Eels are also known as Snake Eels and Sharptail Snake Eel. Snake Eels resemble snakes or worms because they have virtually no fins. Body thin, snake-like, often grayish, but can be olive to purplish brown. Head with small yellow spots, and large, diffuse, pale spots on the body. These body spots often have yellow centers. Size up to 75 cm. Although it is a night feeder that feeds on crabs and small fish, it is often seen by day winding graceful along shallow sandy or grassy bottoms, and even through reefs and rocky areas. It uses its pointed tail to burrow tail first into the mucky bottom sediments, where it can move about easily. It also uses it’s pointed snout to burrow in. Bonaire is an island in the Leeward Antilles in the Caribbean Sea. Together with Aruba and Curacao, it forms the group known as the ABC islands, located off the north coast of South America near the western part of Venezuela. I filmed this video using a Gopro Hero 4 Silver with a Backscatter Filter and a Sealife video strobe.

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